Posts Tagged “Homeschooled”

Perhaps the biggest concern your family and friends will express when you tell them that you are going to homeschool is how your children are going to learn to socialise with their peers if they are not in school.  This is a common fear, and it can be valid in some cases, but for most of the homeschooling families that I know, or have met, it is a misplaced fear.

There are several ways to ensure that your child has every opportunity to develop into a well-adjusted member of society, with friends of many ages.  And this interaction doesn’t necessarily need to involve a single school district, school or overbearing teacher—I promise!

Study Groups and Communal Learning:

With homeschooling becoming a popular and more main-stream choice, a lot of churches have begun welcoming homeschooling groups to come and use their facilities. Fortunately, these homeschool groups are not hard to find. You can Google the subject and get many good results, or also check in with your state homeschooling association to find local groups in your area.  Online homeschool forums are another excellent place to connect with other homeschooling families and to find those who homeschool near you.

If there isn’t a current homeschool group in your own area, consider starting your own. Hang flyers on community boards, churches, and any place where people go.  See what sort of a response you get.  Homeschool groups can vary from a list of contacts for support and socialising, to a formal structure where families meet at set times.  They are handy for advice, support, friendship, and the sharing of skills.  If a parent is proficient in a particular area, they may want to run a class for several children on that topic.  It also becomes a cost-effective option to create small groups for tutoring in specialised subjects such as sports, chemistry, biology, manual arts, maths, physics, etc.

You can participate as much, or as little, as you wish with your homeschool group, but you will know how to get into contact with other homeschooling families should you ever want or need.

Extracurricular Activities:

Today school districts no longer dominant the extra-curricular market. There are a lot of community based organisations that your child can participate, and socialise, in. Joining these groups allows your child to make friends, learn a skill, keep fit, and sample different activities to find their own interests and talents.  If you have a local homeschooling association, this is a great place to start.  Homeschooling parents are usually well-researched into what is available in their local area.  Other families, community centres, even the local council, are all good places to find out what activities are available in your town.  If your town has a directory, this is even better.

Keep in mind, however, that most school districts will (for a fee of course) allow your child to participate in sports and music etc. Feel free to explore that option in addition to exploring private schools and community colleges in the area who will, for the same small fee, allow you to drop-into their activities as well.  These are also great resources for extra classes you may need help with as well, so keep that in mind as a note.

Other Events:

Don’t forget to utilise bookstore events, library events, and any other children/teen events to socialise (and treat!) your child or teen. Look for postings and newsletters to find these. If you don’t ask you may not know that your local community centres, for example, holds a year-long sporting program, as well as arts and crafts lessons.  Many towns also have a theatre group, where your child can participate on stage or behind the scenes.

Also, there is nothing to say that you can’t ask for a written or oral movie review when they return!

In conclusion, there are a variety of socialisation resources around you if you spend the time to look. The result is that you will find a place where your child fits in and has fun.  That is something every loving parent wants for their child.

Melissa Murdoch has a passion for life span development and education, and believes wholeheartedly that a healthy society begins at home.
For further information on how to get started in homeschooling, please visit www.YourHomeschoolCommunity.com.

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What has made so many more parents decide to hop on the homeschooling band wagon? The vast resources offered by Internet access that make homeschooling children a much easier process than ever before. Thanks to the advent of the Internet, parents have all of the resources they could ever want or need when it comes to homeschooling their children appropriately. As more parents are catching on to this fact, more children are being homeschooled. In fact, parents will find that the Internet is an invaluable resource when it comes to teaching their homeschooler everything they need to learn.

From free interactive games to free classic literature e-books, parents are finding that all of the educational tools they require to educate their children are easily accessible with the use of the Internet. No longer do parents have to worry about running from one library to another or from one educational supply store to the next, now that the Internet has made getting homeschooling supplies such a simple task. In fact, with the use of any search engine, parents that are homeschooling their children can find an array of services, both premium and free, for their children. Finally, the homeschooled student can learn much as they explore various interactive and educational sites on the Internet.

The basic resources like dictionaries, encyclopedia articles and mathematical tools are easily available online for the homeschooling child to use whenever they need. Moreover, with the rapid increase in online course offerings, homeschooled students can take several classes specifically designed for the homeschooler. Everything from reading to studying can be done with online tools, and homeschooling parents are thrilled with the new and latest resources at their fingertips.

Parents looking for educational games, lesson plans, worksheets, study guides and the like will find them easily enough while using the Internet. In addition, supplies can be ordered right online and delivered to the homeschooling family’s door—no need to travel to get all the homeschooling resources a family will ever need. Moreover, parents will find that Internet resources can easily supplement what is being taught to the homeschooler in the homeschool setting. Finally, for those parents looking to incorporate strong faith teaching in their homeschooling efforts, online resources can prove invaluable; from biblical stories to online scripture, the homeschooled student can supplement their learning with teachings pertaining to their faith.

Mimi Rothschild is a homeschooling parent, children?s rights activist, author, and Founder and C.E.O. of online education company Learning by Grace, Inc. Rothschild and her husband of twenty-eight years reside in suburban Philadelphia with their eight children.


Feeling that ?our current system of education has broken its promise,? Rothschild co-founded Learning By Grace, Inc. to provide families with Internet-based multimedia education to PreK-12 children all over the world.


In addition to her twenty years of experience as a homeschool mother, Rothschild has written a number of books dealing with education published by McGraw Hill and others. Her Daily Education News Articles consist of feature stories on online homeschooling and alternative education.

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In America, there was a time when the idea of homeschooling raised eyebrows of concern and could result in a visit from social services. A lack of trust by the government and public in general in a parent’s ability to educate their own children made homeschooling a bit of a stigma.

Even today in some circles, there are still many “old school” thinkers that go so far as to say that homeschooling is tantamount to deliberate child abuse. As ridiculous as that sounds to most of us, overcoming such ignorance has been a problem for some parents looking into homeschooling.

Overseas, it can be much worse. Homeschooling is illegal in Germany, a law instituted under Hitler and still enforced today. German families who choose to home school must do so in secret and run the risk of arrest; or worse, having the state take their children away.

Performance of home schools versus public and private schools

It doesn’t take much effort or investigation to discover that homeschoolers excel above their public school counter parts in nearly every category. According to a study conducted by Dr. Lawrence Rudner:

• The average home schooled 8th grade student performs four grade levels above the national average.

• One in four home school students are enrolled in a grade level that is above their age level.

• In every grade and in every subject, home schooled students outperform both public and private school students.

Other studies confirm these findings, showing that home schooled students have a much higher college entry rate, score higher on SAT’s and ACT’s, have a higher rate of college graduation, and earn higher incomes in the workforce.

These numbers come despite the fact that about 25% of parents in America who choose to home school either never attended college, or attended but never received a degree. An additional 7-10% have only an Associate degree.

Why do homeschooled children perform so well?

The advantages to homeschooling are many, and are quite revealing as to why homeschooled children do so well.

One on one attention – Whenever a child needs assistance, the parent is there to give him or her full attention, whereas in public schools a teacher must divide their attention between dozens of children.

Ability to focus more time where needed – If a student excels in math, but flounders in science, then a parent can very easily devote as much time as is needed to teaching science. Public schools are regimented, with each subject receiving equal time regardless as to the performance of the student.

Homeschooled students move at their own pace – If a student excels in math then they can advance much quicker than students in a public school, where all students are required to move at the same pace.

Diminished distractions – The parents control the environment, and there is no peer pressure from other students trying to talk a homeschooled student into doing things other than school work or study.

Do parents need some kind of special training or certification?

Some states highly regulate home schools, requiring training and certification in some instances. However, studies show that there is virtually no difference in performance between homeschooled students in highly regulated states versus homeschooled students in states with little or no regulation.

The truth is that homeschooling is gaining in popularity and as such, more and more information and help materials are becoming available. The modern homeschooling parent can now effectively teach their children, regardless of the parent’s own education level, thanks to pre-developed curriculums such as those provided by Heritage Home School Academy.

Parents today can use these curriculums to guide their children. Some curriculums are so effective that parents can study ahead of their children in any subject for which they are lacking and effectively teach the same subject to their children. Furthermore, many children often “learn to learn,” reaching a point where they are able to teach themselves and follow a curriculum with little interaction required from the parent.

Each year more families choose to start homeschooling, spreading knowledge about its benefits, and erasing old stigmas along the way. For more information about homeschooling and home school curriculums, visit Heritage Home School Academy.

Heritage Home School Academy is a provider of accredited home school curriculums for grades K-12. Heritage also provides a Christian home school curriculum based on the Bible for those wishing to incorporate Christian values into their homeschooling, something that is outlawed in public schools.

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